RECENT FURNITURE PROJECTS

please email: michaelfeather@gmail.com for my address, or phone 01284 830634

 

Limed Oak Shelf with Two Drawers

The oak, which comes from Ickworth Park, is quarter sawn. This means that you can see the rays which are distinctive feature of oak, and especially English oak.

Size: 54.5cm x54.5cm x 20cm deep including the handles.

 

Olive Ash Book Case

I was lucky to buy some lovely streaked 'olive' ash at the Ickworth Park wood fair a couple of years ago, and here is the result. It has an oiled finish which brings out the nut brown colour of the darker streaks. As you can see in the photo, the book case takes standard smaller books and DVD cases. It could be stood on a table or shelf, or fixed to a wall by its strong top rail. The size is 61cm x 61cm x 18.5 cm (max).

 

Oak Storage Shelf with Blue Back (SOLD)

This piece is also made from quarter sawn oak from Ickworth Park. The drawer handles are bog oak from a tree trunk pulled out of the ground in the Fens during some drainage work. The wood will be anything from three to six thousand years old. The bog oak tree trunks buried under the fens are enormous and all tend to lie in one direction, as if felled by a great storm or even a tidal wave.

 

Sycamore Apple Bowl

Some of the terms for types of apples are quite ancient. To 'coddle' is to cook, hence 'codlin'; and a 'pippin' is an apple grown from a pip rather than grafted, so it would be a new hybrid. 'Reinette' means 'little queen' and 'russet' refers to the matt textured skin. As for the named varieties of apples, I hear that it would take three years to eat one of every registered British apple, eating one a day, so we are going to need a bigger bowl for them! This one is made of close grained sycamore with some good colour. The wood came from Ickworth Park in Suffolk. The lettering is 'Half Uncial' which is based on the vertical pen strokes of early texts. The size is 32.5cm diameter.

Sycamore nut bowl

This has Roman lettering, but the 'A' has a top bar to help fill the curved space - it makes it look a little medieval. The sycamore comes from Ickworth Park. It is very close grained and this piece has good colour. I grow walnuts and hazel nuts here, but we have to be quick to beat the squirrels! Size 21.5cm diameter.

 

Shaker Oval Boxes

 

 

 

 

PAST PROJECTS

 

Stash Bowl (sold)

It is called a 'stash' bowl because you can keep it by the door or on your desk to stash your keys/buttons/elastic bands or whatever. The quotation appears in various places, including Buddhist teaching. Notably the quotation comes from a song by Roy Harper called 'Legend', where the poet wanders and muses on the meaning of life, and ends with the statement "Everything is just everything, because everything just is". One interpretation is to say that we must accept life as it is, rather than what we might want it to be. I am sure there are more interpretations, but it always makes me smile.

Cricket Table (sold)

This small round table is based on the traditional cricket table design. The idea is that a cricket table should be stable on uneven ground - such as a cricket ground - and have a bottom shelf to put your beer on while you go off to bat. This one is just right for a coffee table or occasional table indoors. It is very stable so is not easy for children to knock over. It measures 52cm high by 49cm in diameter. It has a brown oak top and a poplar base painted 'Hicks Blue'. Brown oak is quite rare and is oak that has been attacked by beaf-steak fungus.

 

 

Wild Grain Elm Shelf (sold)

with two drawers and bog oak handles

There is not much elm about these days, and this timber is the last of my stock. I was able to place the wild grain to advantage and use some burrs for the drawer fronts. All corners are properly dovetailed and the shelves housed in. It is sealed and waxed.

The size is 45cm x 45cm x 15cm (max).

 

 

 

Small Shaker Style Wall Cabinet (sold)

This is designed as a bathroom or medicine cabinet, or perhaps it might hold a collection of treasures. It is based on an American Shaker original, and is made of brown oak with a bog oak handle. Brown oak is highly prised by cabinet makers and is English oak which has been attacked by beef-steak fungus, which gives it a rich red-brown colour. You may have seen the inside of an old oak hollow tree which often has that same rich red-brown colour.

The size for this cabinet is: 52cm (max) high, by 32.5cm (max) wide, by 130cm deep.

 

 

Cricket Table (sold)

This small round table is based on the traditional cricket table design. The idea is that a cricket table should be stable on uneven ground - such as a cricket ground - and have a bottom shelf to put your beer on while you go off to bat. This one is just right for a coffee table or occasional table indoors. It is very stable so is not easy for children to knock over. It measures 48cm (19 inches) high by 48cm in diameter.

For interested locals, the base is made from ash from my own land and was previously coppiced by Phil and John Kerry in 1962 - and then again by me in 2015. The quarter sawn oak is from Ickworth Park.

 

 

 

 

Limed Oak Shelf with Two Drawers (sold)

I have made a number of these in the past in a variety of woods and finishes, and different sizes. This one is made of quarter sawn oak (look for the rays in the figure). The surface is sanded, wire brushed to open the grain and then finished with liming polish which stays in the grain for that unique limed oak look. You can only really do this with oak because of its open grain. Note the hand turned oak handles with the same grain. The size is 45cm by 45cm by 15cm deep.

 

 

Danish Style Chest of Drawers (sold)

This small chest of drawers was inspired by a piece by Danish designer Axel Kjaersgaard. It is made of locally grown ash for the carcass with spalted ash for the drawer fronts. There are dovetail joints all round. The recessed handles were a little tricky, but I now have the hang of it with the help of a couple of router jigs. The finish is Danish Oil, which is repairable and can be re-oiled or wax polished.